Master of Science in Nursing Clinical Systems Leadership (RN to MSN) Online Program

Our Master of Science in Nursing Clinical Systems Leadership (RN-MSN) online program features two distinct, accelerated paths that recognize nurses’ previous academic accomplishments and years of working experience; RNs with an associate degree in nursing (ADN) follow a 44-credit, two-year curriculum, and RNs with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree pursue a 31-credit, 15-month curriculum.

Both tracks allow nurses to earn their degree in less time than traditional MSN or RN bridge programs, empowering them with the clinical leadership skills to help re-shape patient care at the system level immediately. There are three starts per year – January, May and September – and the program does not require any residencies or travel to campus.

Phone: 1-855-789-7046
Email: admissions@msnonline.arizona.edu

State Authorization

Changes to the Higher Education Act (HEA) require The University of Arizona and the College of Nursing to comply with individual state/jurisdiction authorizations of distance education programs. As the Master of Science in Nursing Clinical Systems Leadership (RN-MSN) program is 100 percent online, most states are authorized or exempt from authorization. The College of Nursing can only admit students from authorized, exempt and in progress jurisdictions at this time. As of 6/2/2015 the following authorizations are in place: RN-MSN State Authorization Map.

If you have any questions or concerns about the State Authorizations, please contact the College of Nursing at admissions@msnonline.arizona.edu or 1-855-789-7046.

For additional information concerning The University of Arizona’s compliance with these regulations please contact the Outreach College or visit the State Authorization webpage.

Accreditation and Affiliations

The University of Arizona College of Nursing is nationally accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, approved by the Arizona State Board of Nursing, and affiliated with the American Association of Colleges of Nursing  and the Western Institute of Nursing